Historical sketch for Anglican Church Residential Schools from the Anglican Church of Canada

Historical sketch for Anglican Church Residential Schools from the Anglican Church of Canada

History of the role of the Anglican Church of Canada in the residential school system, encompassing the period from 1820 to 1969, when the church directly administered the schools.

Historical sketch for Anglican Church Residential Schools from the Anglican Church of Canada

History of the role of the Anglican Church of Canada in the residential school system.

At various times between 1820 and 1969, the Anglican Church of Canada administered about three dozen residential schools and hostels for Indigenous children. They were known as “Indian” and “Eskimo” Residential Schools. At its peak involvement in the late 1920s, the Church concurrently operated 24 schools situated mostly in northern regions of central and western Canada. Some of these residential schools replaced or supplemented mission day schools, others

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from Anglican Church of Canada

were established in new areas replacing earlier boarding schools, and many were built by the government to be run by the Anglican Church. Canada’s other major Christian churches had similar roles in educating Indigenous peoples.

Prior to Confederation in 1867, Anglican missions in remote British North America had three primary objectives– to evangelize local Indigenous populations, to administer to the sick and to provide basic schooling for the young. Many young Indigenous peoples were thus baptized, confirmed by the Church, and educated in the European and Church traditions. On returning to their home communities, Indigenous adherents were expected to promote the appeal of Christian teachings and values. At the time, Church and colonial officials gave little thought to their assimilation into Canadian society at large.

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