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New stories to tell: ecumenism today

Anglican-Roman Catholic: new stories to tell

In over fifty years of formal ecumenical dialogue, Anglicans and Roman Catholics have come a long way in terms of the agreement in faith that exists between our two churches.

Anglicans and Roman Catholics have come a long way in working through many of the divisive points that have separated them since the 16th Century. New Stories to Tell: Living Ecumenism Today is a project of the Anglican – Roman Catholic Dialogue of Canada, which illustrates these strides that have been made. It is a document consisting of 17 stories that demonstrate a growth of mutual understanding and re-establishment of bonds of love and common cause between Anglicans and Roman Catholics.

“This resource is an opportunity to see ecumenism at work in the lives of Anglicans and Roman Catholics in Canada. The theological work of national (Anglican Roman Catholic Dialogue – ARC Canada) and international dialogues (Anglican Roman Catholic International Commission -ARCIC) is finding new expression in the local initiatives expressed in these stories. We hope they will inspire further conversations and witness to the degree of unity we can already share,” states Bishop Linda Nicholls, Anglican Co-Chair of the Anglican Roman Catholic Dialogue of Canada.

 

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New Stories to Tell: Living Ecumenism Today is – without question – proof that ecumenical dialogue has the potential to transform our churches. The stories shared highlight the ways in which we, as people of faith and followers in Christ, can learn to love one another, appreciate the gifts each of us bring to God’s mission, and explore new ways to share in fellowship.

You can find New Stories to Tell: Living Ecumenism Today for download on the churchesindialogue.ca website.

 

"In over fifty years of formal ecumenical dialogue, Anglicans and Roman Catholics have come a long way in terms of the agreement in faith that exists between our two churches. And yet, at the grassroots, often these breakthroughs are not that widely known. The official reports and agreed statements sometimes end up simply gathering dust on library shelves. We think that should change. And we believe that part of that change can come by telling some new stories. These are true stories of Anglican and Roman Catholic connections and partnerships in the real world, made possible by what the ecumenical movement has achieved. It brings texts to life in the lives of real people and places. We hope you enjoy them, and that hearing these stories may inspire you to create your own new stories where you live as well.

"All over Canada and around the world, Roman Catholics and Anglicans live in relationship with one another. We are churches together in society, neighbours in community, and in many cases members of one household. For nearly fifty years, we have had opportunities to talk about that relationship in formal dialogue. Our official conversations have produced many agreed statements and joint documents, and have also led us to deeper understanding, opening up new opportunities to live and work together..."

"Our communion as Anglicans and Roman Catholics may be as yet still “imperfect” or “incomplete.” Nevertheless, new stories show that, thanks be to God, it is very much also “real.” Now is the time to make that communion more and more complete, ever more perfect, into the future. As followers of Jesus, each one of us has a vocation to be artisans of reconciliation. There are many different ways by which we can contribute to this task. We hope you will find your ways, and that as you do you will also share the story."

The work of an ecumenical dialogue conversation is documented in the agreed statements of the Anglican Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC) and reports that it issues. The [other] statements and reports represent the views of the participants. Although the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB) is represented on these [additional] dialogues and conversations, the texts have not been officially endorsed by the CCCB nor do they necessarily have the approval of the Catholic Bishops of Canada or of the Anglican Church of Canada.

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